Tag Archives: Classical Guitar

Classical Guitar for the Blues, Jazz & Rock Player by Andrew Leonard and Truefire.com

Classical Guitar for the Blues, Jazz & Rock Player by Andrew Leonard and Truefire.com

 

Author:                                  Andrew Leonard

Genre:                                    Classical

Level:                                     Beginner | Late Beginner | Intermediate | Late-Intermediate|

Advanced

Features:                                8 Tabs (.pdf)

Lessons:                                 86 Video Lessons (3 hours and 56 minutes)

 

Today, I am going to discuss a course for those interested in getting started in classical music on the guitar. “Classical Guitar for the Blues, Jazz and Rock Player” by Andrew Leonard and Truefire.com is meant to introduce you to the techniques and pieces that are associated with the classical guitar. It is meant to be a transitioning course for those of you who never touched the classical genre and those who come from the realms of rock, blues or jazz.

The course is divided into two sections. Starting out with an introductory section in which you are getting briefed on the basics of classical guitar playing such as posture, gadgets as well as playing technique, you are going to get an initial impression of what to expect when you decide to study this particular musical genre. The instructor takes his time to ensure that everything you need to know in terms of preparations and proper posture is covered.

The second part of the course consists of a selection of themes or excerpts of famous classical pieces that serve as appetizer for you. In this section, you see the themes being performed by the instructor as well as broken down by him step by step, teaching you exactly how to play it. All themes are accompanied by notation/tabs that allow you to either print the sheet music for your own studies, download it on your smartphone or laptop or simply play along as you play yourself through the course. This section serves as a source of reference and something you can play around with.

Let’s have a look at the pieces or themes that you are going to learn following this course. The selection comprises 7 themes that were taken from well-known classical pieces that could be arguably be called essentials of the classical repertoire for a guitar player. You are going to be taught two signature pieces of the Classical Guitar that is usually associated with the Spanish Guitar, namely  Malagueña a classical riff, if you wish, and Spanish Romance.

Furthermore, you are getting introduced to several high-classed composers that are usually connected with the classical guitar, such as Isaac Albéniz (Leyenda) and Francisco Tarréga (Lagrima). Those two composers are amongst my personal favorite ones on the guitar. Their pieces are very challenging but also very rewarding. Studying the classical guitar means having to deal with those two composers and their legendary pieces.

Classical guitar, however, is not just about Spanish composers, which is why you are also going to get introduced to other famous people that contributed hugely to the development of the guitar as a mainstream instrument of the 20th century and beyond.

With Mauro Giuliani’s Le Papillon (Op. 50 No. 13) and Johann Sebastian Bach’s Bourrée in Em as well as a famous theme of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart by Fernando Sor, you get to know famous composers from Italy and Germany that are probably the most famous names associated with classical music.

This collection of themes and pieces are a great starting point to get introduced to the classical genre on the guitar. You have a pretty broad repertoire that you can play around with and see if that style truly suits you. You get briefed in music history as well as different styles that all contribute to what is regarded as a timeless era of music and particularly the guitar.

All lessons are broken down into several sections so you can practice small chunks at first until you get the whole piece correct. The demonstration is clearly visible, the audio quality decent and the provided .pdf charts help a lot in following the lessons and play the pieces on your own without the need to constantly follow the videos.

The only topic that I have been missing throughout the course was a lecture on how to sight read with some basic examples, but that may be too much for an introductory course as this represents a major skill in general.

Let’s conclude my impression of Classical Guitar for the Blues, Jazz & Rock Player by Andrew Leonard, produced for Truefire.com. If you are trying to get in touch with a historically and musically rich genre, no matter what your current skill level is, wanting to receive an overview of important names, styles and pieces associated with that genre, then you have come to the right place. This course is meant as an introduction to classical music on the guitar, nothing more.

Don’t expect a full-fleshed course that will make you a superstar on the classical guitar. This course gives you an overview, that’s what it is meant to do, and it does so in a very interesting way. It might be the first step of your career as a classical guitarist!

 

 

Lukas Wedrychowski

www.meridirhproductions.com – ‘cause music matters

This course was kindly provided by Truefire.com for the purpose of a review.

 

 

 

 

Nutcracker March | Tchaikovsky | Easy Beginner Theme | Classical Fingerstyle Guitar

Hey everyone,

 

here’s my arrangement of Tchaikovsky’s classical theme of the “Nutcracker March”! 🙂 It should suit beginning classical guitar players very well and it is a fun piece to play! I hope you’ll enjoy it! Tell me in the comment below if you liked it.

 

Once I transcribed this arrangement I am going to release the sheet music for free here on my website!

Stay tuned,

 

Lukas

 

 

 

Tschaikovsky’s March Slave Theme | Intermediate Fingerstyle Arrangement by Lukas Wedrychowski| Free Tabs / Notation Download

Hey everyone,

 

here’s my arrangement of Tschaikovsky’s “March Slave”. It is meant to be an arrangement for the intermediate player or maybe “late-beginner”, as it includes harmonics and some more advanced techniques such as slides (from a beginner’s perspective).

I hope you enjoy this version of it. Please, consider subscribing to my YouTube channel as well as sharing my videos on your socials and giving my videos a thumb up if you liked it! This helps me out a lot as I am still growing!

Thank you so much!

 

I wish you an amazing day,

Lukas

 

Click the link below to download the arrangement.

Pjotr Iljitsch Tschaikowski – March Slave – Intermdiate Theme

#ProgressLog | Guitar (Y1/W1)

Hey everyone,

so here’s my weekly progress entry. For the better part of the week I’ve been stuck with Für Elise which is a real blast! It is probably the most difficult piece I’ve studied so far. That’s the reason why I haven’t managed to fully learn it but I will keep it in my plannings for the next “Classical week”, when I will most likely finish it completely and record what I’ve got! However, I’ll make sure to upload regular updates on how I progress on that piece.

My practice schedule so far was pretty straight forwards. I figured out the chords and basic patterns that I needed for this piece and isolated them in my practice. So far the changes go relatively smoothly, however, there are still some that require futher practice (in particular those who require a three-string-barring with a single finger).

Year 1 (2017) – Week 1

Guitar | SUMMARY

  • Repertoire
    • Classical:
      • “Für Elise” by Ludwig van Beethoven (Part A + B finished, although B not recorded yet)
  • Theory
    • Scales:
      • Major Scale (D, A, F, B) ==== Theoretically I know these scales now by heart.
      • Minor Pentatonic Scale (2nd box) ==== Didn’t manage to get this one done.
    • Chords:
      • Am, E, F ==== Done!
    • Key signatures
      • Repeating C, D, E, F, G, A, B ==== I managed to learn C, D, E and F but not the rest.
    • Intervals
      • Root to perfect 8th ==== Done!
  • Technique
    • Spider exercise ==== Done!
    • Scale practise
      • Major Scale(D, A, F, B) ==== I only managed to practice D, A and F
    • Chord Practice
      • Am, E, F ==== Done! Although some inversions require some stretches.
    • Rhythm Practice
      • Standard 4/4 fingerstyle pattern (4) ==== Done!
    • New Technique
      • Basic percussive elements ==== Done but not yet repeated. Probably the upcoming week!

Alright that was quite something! As I once said I will most likely be able to do vLog summaries of my weekly practice sessions at the start of mid-february since I’ve got a huuuuuge exam coming up and I can’t find the time to set up everything properly for that yet. So until mid february you will get these pure text-based lessons with some clips of the pieces that I recorded so far.

Here’s part A of Beethoven’s “Für Elise”! Sorry for that one mistake! I promise once I finished the piece I will record it without any mistakes at all ! :^)

Year 2 (2017) – Week 2

Guitar | PLANNING

  • Repertoire
    • Classical:
      • “Für Elise” by Ludwig van Beethoven (practicing the current two parts)
    • Spanish / Flamenco:
      • “Study in Dm” from “Spanish Guitar 1” by “Guita-in-a-nutshell.com”
  • Theory
    • Scales:
      • Major Scale (D, A, F, B)
      • Minor Pentatonic Scale (2nd box)
    • Chords:
      • Am, E, F
    • Key signatures
      • Repeating C, D, E, F, G, A, B
    • Intervals
      • Root to perfect 8th – Repetition
  • Technique
    • Spider exercise (Warm up)
    • Scale practise
      • Major Scale (D, A, F, B)
    • Chord Practice
      • [to be announced]
    • Rhythm Practice
      • Standard 4/4 fingerstyle pattern (4)
    • New Technique
      • Basic percussive elements

Basically my practice remains unchanged with the exception of the chords, the patterns and the song that I will be practicing. 🙂 Stay tuned for more!

#ProgressGuitar | Update on “Für Elise” (Y1/W1)

 

Hello everyone,

this is my mid-week update for Y1/W1. I’m still head over heel with “Für Eliseby Ludwig van Beethoven. It’s a pretty piece but at the same, also quite tricky due to its key changes. This video shows my progress after three days. I’ve just completed the first section of the piece and will start with the second one today.

In total there are three parts to cover before I can finish the piece so it is still a long way to go before I can add this to my repertoire. However, I will give my best to finish it in time and provide a #vLog update at the end of this week.

Stay tuned!

Lukas

 

P.S. If you haven’t yet, please consider subscribing to my channel so you get notified once I upload my videos and progress.