EASTER CONCERT 2017 !!!

Hey everyone!

 

today’s finally the day I’ll perform a small concert for my family! I’m looking forward to it! Here’s the full schedule 🙂

 

Guitar
1. Ludwig van Beethoven: Für Elise
2. Johann Sebastian Bach: Bourrée in Em – BWV996
3. Mary Had a Little Lamb (in Am)
 
Piano
1. (aus) LaLa Land: City of Stars
2. (aus) Gladiator: Honor Him
3. Greensleeves
 
Violin
1. Ode an die Freude (duett)
2. Bard & Family (solo)
 
Happy Easter!
 
 
 
 
 
Frohe Ostern euch allen!!!!
 
Viele Grüße,
 
Lukas

#Let’s Review | Essentials: Chet Atkins Style by Muriel Anderson and Truefire.com

Essentials: Chet Atkins Style by Muriel Anderson and Truefire.com

 

Author:         Muriel Anderson

Genre:           Acoustic

Style:             Fingerstyle

Level:            Late Beginner / Intermediate

Features:      Tabs (.pdf) & GP5 files

Lessons:      33 Videos (incl. introduction & conclusion) | 127 Minutes

1 – Essentials: Chet Atkins Style  (Introduction)

2 – Some Notes About Chet (Overview)

3 – Maybellish (Overview)

4 – Maybellish (Performance)

5 – Maybellish (Breakdown)

6 – Nashville Hammer (Overview)

7 – Nashville Hammer (Performance)

8 – Nashville Hammer (Breakdown)

9 – Love to Pick (Overview)

10 – Love to Pick (Peformance)

11 – Love to Pick (Breakdown)

12 – Doh’tcha Know (Overview)

13 – Doh’tcha Know (Performance)

14 – Doh’tcha Know (Breakdown)

15 – Waiting on the Weather (Overview)

16 – Waiting on the Weather (Performance)

17 – Waiting on the Weather (Breakdown)

18 – Jo Bangles (Overview)

19 – Jo Bangles (Performance)

20 – Jo Bangles (Breakdown)

21 – Rolling Hills (Overview)

22 – Rolling Hills (Performance)

23 – Rolling Hills (Breakdown

24 – Chet’s Train (Overview)

25 – Chet’s Train (Performance)

26 – Chet’s Train (Breakdown)

27 – Mr. Chester (Overview)

28 – Mr. Chester (Performance)

29 – Mr. Chester (Breakdown)

30 – A Fine Pickle (Overview)

31 – A Fine Pickle (Performance)

32 – A Fine Pickle (Breakdown)

33 – Essentials: Chet Atkins Style (Conclusion)

 

 

Essentials: Chet Atkins Style is part of the essentials series on Truefire.com. It’s considered to be a sum up on what may be considered crucial on a particular topic. In typical Truefire fashion you’re going to literally play yourself through the material, applying what you’ve just learnt to ten pieces that are designed to showcase essential techniques that can be seen as trademarks of Chet Atkins. Chet Atkins is one of the most influential players and one that had an impact on most fingerstyle players nowadays. Some of his key signatures, such as the electric guitar or the thumb pick were, among others, true to the sound he was recognized for and associated with.

In this course, you are going to get to know this amazing artist with the help of Muriel Anderson, who has some of the finest fingerstyle courses on Truefire. I always enjoy her clear explanations as well as proper technique. She clearly understands to break down complex material so that it becomes more approachable and accessible for players of varying levels.

Since this course is dedicated to players who have just passed the beginner stage and head towards the intermediate level you can expect a lot of detailed work in it. This course is aimed at players who have just nailed the basics of music theory and basic fingerstyle techniques to now delve deeper into the style of Chet Atkins.

The tunes in this course increase in difficulty the more you progress. You start out with Maybellish in which you underline your play with a very basic bass-chord accompaniment. The next on the list, Nashville Hammer, already goes a step further and introduces an alternating bass which helps you to grow your thumb independence, an essential skill among fingerstyle players.

Nashville Hammer

1.: Muriel Anderson in action on Nashville Hammer

However, there are also more difficult ones in there to put your skills to a test. One of those is Anderson’s own tune, Mr. Chester, in which you implement some of the techniques that you’ve been already introduced to by now following the curriculum of the course. Beside those you also get to know, “a chord form, that you see Chet using all the time. This little three finger chord.” (Muriel Anderson)

3 Finger Chord Form

1.: Three Finger Chord Shape Typical for Chet Atkin’s Play

I very much enjoyed this course, not only because I’ve been listening to Chet Atkins recordings as well as interviews about this fascinating and inspiring personality. Muriel Anderson certainly did him justice by covering essentials of his playing style, one that affected so many players who now play the wonderful style of fingerstyle guitar!

The course covers more than two hours of video footage as well as all ten tunes in tab and .pdf format, as always in high quality, as known from Truefire.com. That way you get enough possibilities to not only learn the pieces but also to further analyse it in order to enhance and widen your musical knowledge. I always loved the courses on Truefire since they allow you to literally play throughout the whole course, enjoying what you learn in a musical way.

If you are into fingerstyle it is almost guaranteed that you’ll draw a lot out of this course but Chet Atkins was more than just a fingerstyle player… he was inspirational and charismatic and that’s what he showed with his music. I really hope you may find this course useful the way I did and that you may also find your own sound.

Lukas Wedrychowski

Meridirh Productions – ‘cause music matters

#Let’s Play | Mary Had a Little Lamb – Version in Am | Arr. by Lukas Wedrychowski

Hey everyone

 

here’s a new video! It’s my rendition of the famous tune “Mary had a little lamb”, but in Am. It’s darker than the original but something that I found still fitting if we consider the times we live in.

I hope you enjoy it! 🙂

 

How to set up a practice routine ?

Hey everyone,

ever since I decided to learn music without a teacher I had to come up with various practice routines to support my development as a musician. In the beginning I wasn’t sure what to do since I lacked the knowledge of what to focus on.

After a few months I learnt some basics out of a beginner’s book on music theory and a guitar method that I bought along with my first, very cheap guitar.

The main four aspects of practice that I think everyone should be focusing and that proved the most effective for me (considering the fact that I am quite happy what I’ve achieved so far): Continue reading How to set up a practice routine ?

#Let’s Review | 30 Beginner Fingerstyle Blues Licks You Must by David Hamburger and Truefire.com

30 Beginner Fingerstyle Blues Licks You Must by David Hamburger and Truefire.com

 

Author:          David Hamburger

Genre:            Blues

Style:              Fingerstyle Blues

Level:             Beginner / Late Beginner

Features:        Tabs (.pdf) & GP5 files

Lessons:         32 Videos (incl. introduction & conclusion) | 134 Minutes

Lick 1 – Going Down

Lick 2 – Are You With Me?

Lick 3 – Hammerhead

Lick 4 – The Pickup

Lick 5 – The Long and Short of It

Lick 6 – Flat Five

Lick 7 – Triple Lightnin’

Lick 8 – After the Fact

Lick 9 – Pull Yourself Together

Lick 10 – Train Vamp

Lick 11 – Brush Up Your Hopkins

Lick 12 – The Long Hello

Lick 13 – Half Stepping

Lick 14 – Whole Lotta Bob

Lick 15 – Barrelhouse

Lick 16 – The Third is the Word

Lick 17 – The Ninth Circuit

Lick 18 – Big Anticipation

Lick 19 – Delta D

Lick 20 – Little Root

Lick 21 – Chromatic Walkup

Lick 22 – Purple Phrase

Lick 23 – Extra Five

Lick 24 – Old School

Lick 25 – Ornamental

Lick 26 – Train Licks and Triplets

Lick 27 – Walkin’

Lick 28 – Dirty Rivers

Lick 29 – One Size Fits All

Lick 30 – Unknown Richard

 

David Hamburger is one of the predominant figures on Truefire.com who is associated with Fingerstyle Blues. No wonder, with him being an award-winning author for Acoustic Guitar Methods “Beginning Blues Guitar” as well as “The Acoustic Guitar Method” and an experienced teacher and player! I first came across David’s courses on Truefire when I was wondering on how to best pick up Fingerstyle Blues. I’ve always been a fan of playing all together, being in control of everything that happens in a musical context and Fingerstyle just suited me the most. The first course from David that I had encountered had been “Fingerstyle Blues Factory” one that I can highly recommend as well and that will be part of a future review for sure. What hooked me about David was his highly didactic teaching style, not only explaining the quintessence of what he is supposed to teach in a particular course but also embellishing it with his vast knowledge of music in general, the general historical side of it as well as his own experience but in particular about the Blues. To me, David Hamburger seems to be a man that has lived the Blues his entire life! If you’ve also got infected by it, then read on.

30 Beginner Fingerstyle Blues Licks you MUST know” is part of a series focusing on essentials of a particular style, packed within licks with the aim to both, increase your musical vocabulary on the instrument and sparking your inspiration by giving you something along the way that you can work on and use in your everyday practice.

30 selected licks that suit the beginning fingerstyle or beginning Blues player in such, as they incorporate various basics that are essential to playing this very style. The great thing about this course is, that it accompanies smoothly David’s other courses on Truefire.com that are dedicated to beginning fingerstyle Blues players. You can see it as an etude course that gives you even more material to practice the concepts that are taught in the other courses (Fingerstyle Blues Handbook 1 and Fingerstyle Blues Handbook 2).

Going through all those 30 licks would consume too much space and would probably take the excitement out of it so I am going to stick to some personal preferences that I found particularly interesting for beginners that would both enhance the motivation to keep digging into Fingerstyle Blues by providing easy-to-accomplish building blocks that are immediately usable in your own music.

Starting with basic techniques, you can’t but to start from simple to more complex. In Fingerstyle, the thumb independence is crucial and that’s why the first lick Going Down includes a steady bass line while descending an Em pentatonic scale. That way you are able to keep a constant motion of your thumb going over a contrasting movement of the melody lines in form of the pentatonic scale, one that is often used as the very first scale that beginners learn in order to learn the basics of soloing. Of course, the pentatonic scale offers more than is included in this lick but it’s a very good starter to teach you how to build up muscle memory and grow from there on.

In Hammerhead you learn a lick that focuses on the typical bluesy hammer-on. That’s actually an interesting one because you’ll have to focus on the correct feeling and groove while performing the hammer-on to make it sound bluesy. Once performed right you’re packed with a lick that is as characteristic as a Blues lick can possibly be.

The great thing about this course and David Hamburger is that you are not only learning the techniques, but as I’ve already mentioned beforehand, learning about the important stuff that goes along with it and that surrounds the technical knowledge that you’re about to get taught. If we put lick #7 – Triple Lightnin’ –  into perspective this does mean learning a typical triplet pattern that, paired with a minor pentatonic scale, let’s you be immediately associated with blues. However, it isn’t just about the lick, here you also get introduced to the style of Lightnin’ Hopkins, something whom you, should you not have already listened to him, should definitely check out!

As a beginner, it can sometimes be quite difficult to produce and get the tone that you really want in order to sound like a Blues player. However, in Train Vamp you’re about to get a lick that will serve you as a good study at the same time in order to master the quarter-tone or quarter-step bend that actually “is a band that raises a note only half as far as a half-step or one-fret-band” (David Hamburger). This does mean that it’s in between two frets and something that, without any other aids, isn’t manageable without a bend. The tricky thing here lies within the quality of the tone. You want to play it as smoothly as possible, not marking any transitioning within the bend. This may take some time but once accomplished, is going to give you something to work with for the rest of your career.

To sum this review up I really have to give credits to David for his, one again, great course that is clear-cut, well-defined and explained but also packed with all the information and little hints that boosts the motivation of an aspiring guitar player. I really enjoyed going through those 30 licks and it took me quite some time to decide which licks to choose for this review that suit the audience of this course as well as more experienced players who want to delve deeper into the blues, be it electrical or fingerstyle.

In typical Truefire fashion, this course comes with the notation being tabbed out and Guitar Pro files. The total rundown of this course is a bit more than two hours but what you get drag out of it is most likely going to last for way longer than just these hours. I hope this course is going to inspire you as much as it did inspire me and that you are going to have fun with these 30 beginner fingerstyle blues licks you really MUST know.

 

 

Lukas Wedrychowski

Meridirh Productions – ‘cause music matters