Classical Guitar for the Blues, Jazz & Rock Player by Andrew Leonard and Truefire.com

Classical Guitar for the Blues, Jazz & Rock Player by Andrew Leonard and Truefire.com

 

Author:                                  Andrew Leonard

Genre:                                    Classical

Level:                                     Beginner | Late Beginner | Intermediate | Late-Intermediate|

Advanced

Features:                                8 Tabs (.pdf)

Lessons:                                 86 Video Lessons (3 hours and 56 minutes)

 

Today, I am going to discuss a course for those interested in getting started in classical music on the guitar. “Classical Guitar for the Blues, Jazz and Rock Player” by Andrew Leonard and Truefire.com is meant to introduce you to the techniques and pieces that are associated with the classical guitar. It is meant to be a transitioning course for those of you who never touched the classical genre and those who come from the realms of rock, blues or jazz.

The course is divided into two sections. Starting out with an introductory section in which you are getting briefed on the basics of classical guitar playing such as posture, gadgets as well as playing technique, you are going to get an initial impression of what to expect when you decide to study this particular musical genre. The instructor takes his time to ensure that everything you need to know in terms of preparations and proper posture is covered.

The second part of the course consists of a selection of themes or excerpts of famous classical pieces that serve as appetizer for you. In this section, you see the themes being performed by the instructor as well as broken down by him step by step, teaching you exactly how to play it. All themes are accompanied by notation/tabs that allow you to either print the sheet music for your own studies, download it on your smartphone or laptop or simply play along as you play yourself through the course. This section serves as a source of reference and something you can play around with.

Let’s have a look at the pieces or themes that you are going to learn following this course. The selection comprises 7 themes that were taken from well-known classical pieces that could be arguably be called essentials of the classical repertoire for a guitar player. You are going to be taught two signature pieces of the Classical Guitar that is usually associated with the Spanish Guitar, namely  Malagueña a classical riff, if you wish, and Spanish Romance.

Furthermore, you are getting introduced to several high-classed composers that are usually connected with the classical guitar, such as Isaac Albéniz (Leyenda) and Francisco Tarréga (Lagrima). Those two composers are amongst my personal favorite ones on the guitar. Their pieces are very challenging but also very rewarding. Studying the classical guitar means having to deal with those two composers and their legendary pieces.

Classical guitar, however, is not just about Spanish composers, which is why you are also going to get introduced to other famous people that contributed hugely to the development of the guitar as a mainstream instrument of the 20th century and beyond.

With Mauro Giuliani’s Le Papillon (Op. 50 No. 13) and Johann Sebastian Bach’s Bourrée in Em as well as a famous theme of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart by Fernando Sor, you get to know famous composers from Italy and Germany that are probably the most famous names associated with classical music.

This collection of themes and pieces are a great starting point to get introduced to the classical genre on the guitar. You have a pretty broad repertoire that you can play around with and see if that style truly suits you. You get briefed in music history as well as different styles that all contribute to what is regarded as a timeless era of music and particularly the guitar.

All lessons are broken down into several sections so you can practice small chunks at first until you get the whole piece correct. The demonstration is clearly visible, the audio quality decent and the provided .pdf charts help a lot in following the lessons and play the pieces on your own without the need to constantly follow the videos.

The only topic that I have been missing throughout the course was a lecture on how to sight read with some basic examples, but that may be too much for an introductory course as this represents a major skill in general.

Let’s conclude my impression of Classical Guitar for the Blues, Jazz & Rock Player by Andrew Leonard, produced for Truefire.com. If you are trying to get in touch with a historically and musically rich genre, no matter what your current skill level is, wanting to receive an overview of important names, styles and pieces associated with that genre, then you have come to the right place. This course is meant as an introduction to classical music on the guitar, nothing more.

Don’t expect a full-fleshed course that will make you a superstar on the classical guitar. This course gives you an overview, that’s what it is meant to do, and it does so in a very interesting way. It might be the first step of your career as a classical guitarist!

 

 

Lukas Wedrychowski

www.meridirhproductions.com – ‘cause music matters

This course was kindly provided by Truefire.com for the purpose of a review.

 

 

 

 

Nutcracker March | Tchaikovsky | Easy Beginner Theme | Classical Fingerstyle Guitar

Hey everyone,

 

here’s my arrangement of Tchaikovsky’s classical theme of the “Nutcracker March”! 🙂 It should suit beginning classical guitar players very well and it is a fun piece to play! I hope you’ll enjoy it! Tell me in the comment below if you liked it.

 

Once I transcribed this arrangement I am going to release the sheet music for free here on my website!

Stay tuned,

 

Lukas

 

 

 

Tschaikovsky’s March Slave Theme | Intermediate Fingerstyle Arrangement by Lukas Wedrychowski| Free Tabs / Notation Download

Hey everyone,

 

here’s my arrangement of Tschaikovsky’s “March Slave”. It is meant to be an arrangement for the intermediate player or maybe “late-beginner”, as it includes harmonics and some more advanced techniques such as slides (from a beginner’s perspective).

I hope you enjoy this version of it. Please, consider subscribing to my YouTube channel as well as sharing my videos on your socials and giving my videos a thumb up if you liked it! This helps me out a lot as I am still growing!

Thank you so much!

 

I wish you an amazing day,

Lukas

 

Click the link below to download the arrangement.

Pjotr Iljitsch Tschaikowski – March Slave – Intermdiate Theme

#ProgressLog | My plans for September

Hey everyone,

it’s already september and we’re nearing 2018! Amazing how time passes by. I wanted to let you know my plans for September, the end of the 3rd quarter of 2017.

However, I first have to make an announcement! We reached over 2000 <—– (!!!!!!!!) views on my guitar progress video! I never expected anything like that (!!!!!!!). I’m so super happy that so many people clicked and viewed the video. What strikes me most, however, are the beautiful comments that you guys left below the video! I read all of them and I tried to answer all of them! Thank you so much for your lovely comments! You are an amazing community! I’ll do all I can do keep up my progress if it really inspires some of you! That’s the least I can do for all the great feedback I received from you guys! Thank you so so much!

As you may have noticed, I wasn’t able to write much the last month. This is due to my stay in England. I am going to spend September in England and improve upon my language skills and do the intercultural project that is compulsory for my study.

However, the family that I will be with throughout September does have some instruments at home, so I am able to practice a bit. Since I won’t be able to take all my studies with me, I am mainly going to use that remaining time in England to write new pieces!

The goal is to capture my impressions in that pieces and at the same time incorporate the techniques that I have know accquired over the last 1,5 years. I’ll make sure to post a video from time to time, showing you my progress! In case I fail to do so, be excited to see some of my new songs!

 

Beside that I want to reveal to you what I have planned for the remaining 4th quarter of 2017. The main goal on all my instruments is to reach the next level:

Guitar -> Intermediate

Piano -> Intermediate

Violin -> Late-Beginner / Intermediate
Ocarina -> Late-Beginner / Intermediate

Cajón -> Late-Beginner / Intermediate

 

For that purpose I want to finish the songs that I set myself as a goal for this year. Those songs/pieces are:

 

Guitar:

  1. Spanish Romance / Romanza  (the reason why I started out on the guitar and particularly classical guitar)

2. Carulli: Waltz in Em

3. Tschaikovsky: Nutcracker Theme

4. Dvorak: New World Theme

5. Haydn: Surprise Theme

6. Strauss: The Blue Danube

7. Silent Night (fingerstyle version by Gareth Evans)

 

Piano:

1. La-La-Land “City of Stars” accomp.

2. He’s a Pirate

3. Für Elise

4. Prelude in C (Bach)

5. Greensleeves

 

Violin:

1. He’s a Pirate

2. Hallelujah

3. Oh Christmas Tree

4. Mad World

5. La Claire de la Lune

 

Ocarina:

1. Silent Night

2. Ode to Joy

3. He’s a Pirate

4. Greensleeves

 

 

 

 

As you can see, a lot of those songs are themed for christmas, as it is approaching. Those pieces are mostly “easy” to play and also pieces that I wanted to play for a very long time.

Once I finish them I am going to attempt higher level arrangements and hopefully leave the “beginner level” 🙂  I’m so excited to see if I can achieve this!

 

Please keep sharing my videos and also keep liking them as it helps a lot to know what videos you guys are interested in! 🙂 Thank you !

 

 

Lukas

“Will of the unknown” – Free Tabs Download

Hey there,

 

now that my video has reached quite a lot of people I wanted to share with you the tabs for the piece. However, keep in mind that I am a beginner when it comes to transcribing. So the tabs right now are kind of a mess. However, I am planning to release an updated version of it around the end of this year / beginning of next year.

 

So stay tuned and so far have fun working your way through this version.

This was the first tune I worked on for my proposal! 🙂 It’s officially the first piece out of seven original ones that were meant to be a gift and a hidden message to my girlfriend. All the titles, their very first words/syllables, form the question (in german): “Will you marry me?”

 

Click the Download link below:  (WARNING: keep in mind that this is the first transcription I ever did, it isn’t that good and I plan on releasing a new version soon!!!)

Will of the unknown x

 

 

 

Stay tuned,

 

Lukas

#Let’sReview | Street Theory for Guitarists by Jeff Scheetz and Truefire.com

Street Theory for Guitarists by Jeff Scheetz and Truefire.com

 

Author:                              Jeff Scheetz

Genre:                                 Theory

Level:                                   Beginner | Late Beginner | Intermediate | Late                                                    Intermediate | Advanced

Features:                            38 Tabs (.gp5) + 40 Charts (.pdf) + 5 Jam Tracks (.mp3)

Lessons:                              45 Video Lessons (4 hours and 44 minutes)

 

 

Today’s review is about a new theory course by Jeff Scheetz and Truefire. For those of you who aren’t familiar with Jeff Scheetz; he is the director of education at Truefire.com. He has already released numerous courses designed to help you improve your journey on the guitar. One of those courses is his „Smart practice for guitar“. This course focuses on another major topic that is key in improving fast: theory.

Theory is usually considered one of those demons that someone put into this world in order to torture us; in particular guitarists. However, theory can ease the learning process a lot! You certainly do not need theory in order to be musical. You can go ahead and create notes on an instrument and replicate songs just by ear and once you figure out how your instrument works.

Why should we then bother to learn theory at all? Let me tell you something I experienced when I started out on the guitar.

I once went to Spain with my guitar and as I was walking around the streets of Cordoba, I noticed another guitar player. I sat next to Raúl and we talked a bit about the guitar, music in Spain and so forth. A little bit later, we decided to have a small jam session. He was clearly better than I was since I had just started out but the way we connected through our instruments and played together was truly an experience that sparked my motivation for music even more. Wait… why am I telling you this? Well, in order to be able to play together we had to be on the same page. We achieved this by clarifying in which key we were about to to play and generally knowing our instrument in terms of notes, chords and basic musical stuff such as melody and harmony. In short, we connected through theory.

“Street Theory for Guitaristsis a catchy title, but one that contains more than you would expect at first sight. Before watching this course I asked myself: what would it take to connect with other musicians you meet? Which concepts would it need to speak the same language and to be able to connect with other musicians?

Going back to the story that I had just told you, I would like to answer what it took for me to connect with Raúl by going over the content of this course. As I’ve mentioned, you certainly need to know your own instrument before you can engage in conversations. That’s why the first section is all about the very fundamentals of your guitar.

Fundamentals include the musical alphabet“, referring back to the notes on your fretboard. If you meet other musicians on the street it is more likely to happen without tabs hanging off a wall so you need to be able to refer to notes if you want to exchange pieces and have a jam session. In order to do so, you certainly need to know your own instrument in terms of notes or the musical alphabet.

The process of learning the notes on the fretboard can be a daunting one. However, this course slowly builds that important skill by first showing you how to name the notes on the 5th and the 6th string. If you know these two strings, you will already know three strings, since you’ve got two E-strings that work the same way. Once you have this skill down you are going to learn how to find octaves on the guitar. Octaves help you to identify the various positions that exist on the fretboard and to navigate through different voicings. It also helps you build chords by narrowing the fretboard.

Once you’ve nailed the note names on the fretboard it is time to connect them by applying what is known as intervals. Intervals are the distances between two notes. As so much on the guitar, intervals are easily learnt by learning the different shapes. Last but not least, the fundamentals section is closed out by learning probably the two most important scales (arguably); the chromatic scale and the major scale.

The second section is all about chords. Knowing the formula for building chords is essential if you want to understand the concept of chord triads and chord inversions. You are also going to learn why we guitarists need barre chords and what the secret of that “barre” actually is. Once you nailed this, you are going to be taught how to name the chords in terms of roman numerals and how to build progressions out of them. Another important concept that is brought to you by Jeff Scheetz is the method to identify in which key your song is in so you know which chords to play in common progressions.

 

Moving on to section three, you move away from the harmonic side of music and turn towards the melodic side of it! Unless already familiar with them, you are going to be introduced to scales and different types of scales (pentatonic and blues scales as well as modes! Knowing which scale to play is crucial if you want to transfer the correct mood of a song and literally playing and staying on the same page as your fellow musicians.

Last but not least, there are some further important concepts that could certainly be put into the other sections but that are slightly more advanced. In section 4 you learn about the CAGED system and how it functions within the different chords that you can play all around the neck! This really opens up the whole neck for you and gives you more freedom and more voicings to explore! You will also learn how to move harmonies and how to arpeggiate chords. Those concepts will allow you to articulate yourself in a more complex way.

Let’s sum this course up… “Street Theory for Guitarists” by Jeff Scheetz and Truefire.com is one of those courses you may have wished as part of your starter kit, as part of your very first guitar as it can help you digest the massive load of information that you will have to acquire throughout your career. Theory is not boring at all. The way it used to be taught, however, was old-fashioned. Learn music theory the cool way with Jeff Scheetz and be able to connect with other musicians and actually speak the same language!

Highly recommended!

 

 

Lukas Wedrychowski

www.meridirhproductions.com – ‘cause music matters

 

This course was provided by Truefire.com

Fingerstyle Essentials | Fingerpicking Pattern No. 2

Hey everyone,

 

I wanted to share with you something I came up with recently. For all you beginners out there, I wanted to share my most important fingerstyle patterns that I learnt during my first 1,5 Years on the guitar.

It’s a nice 8th note pattern that builds up dynamically and allows for quite some emotional and intense fills and runs in your own performances.

Website Insert

Click here to download the study (.pdf format)

Fingerpicking Pattern No. 2

 

This fingerstyle study consists of three parts.

Part one shows you the very basic pattern. Starting with your middle finger (M), going over to your index finger (I), repeating that pattern and then moving up to the ring finger (R) and then a rundown with your M, I  before returning to your M.

So the basic version of this pattern in PIMA-format looks like this:

M-I-M-I-R-M-I-M

1  +  2 + 3  + 4 +

 

The second level of this pattern includes the bass note. On the 1 you simply add the respective bass note of the chord you are playing with the thumb (T).  So, say you are playing an Am chord. You then want to play the open 5th string.

M/T-I-M-I-R-M-I-M

1  +  2 + 3  + 4 +

 

Then I show you a small alteration of the pattern which gives you the possiblity of bridging to another chord or another sequence or generally a verse  or a chorus, depending on your arrangement’s or song’s structure.

M-I-M-I-R_R R_R     (R_R = like a tie; holding the note)

1  +  2 + 3  + 4 +

 

My approach ever since I started out as a beginner on the guitar was to transform everything I learn into music and having fun with it. That’s why I always want to show you what you can do with the stuff that I am showing you.

Below you will find my arrangement of “Mary Had A Little Lamb” in Am, featuring this beautiful fingerpicking pattern! Go check it out and don’t forget to leave a like, a comment and most importantly, to subscribe to my channel!

See you next time!

And don’t forget to have fun with your guitar! 😉

Lukas